Vermont Weddings by Vermont Bride
Click here to find Vermont Weddings Vendors

OUR Blog


Scarlet and Dusty Blue Wedding Inspiration | Color Palette | Vermont Bride Magazine

Scarlet & Dusty Blue Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Red and blue is a classic color combination that never goes out of style. Give it a modern twist with a sensuous shade of scarlet red and dusty blue with soft gray accents. This bold and powerful duo fit just as easily in a rustic, barn theme as a modern, industrial setting. With July Fourth right around the corner we couldn't think of a better time to share these gorgeous images from our Summer/Fall 2016 issue of Vermont Bride magazine. To see more photos from this feature be sure to get your copy today!

Scarlet & Dusty Blue Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Scarlet & Dusty Blue Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

featured professionals | PHOTOGRAPHY: Lavishly Lux Studio | EVENT PLANNER: The Pink Tuxedos Wedding and Event Planning | VENUE: Event 1013 | MAKEUP ARTIST: Impeccable Faces MUA by Ronnika Williams | FLORAL DESIGN: Bella Fleur Designs | MODEL: Roxanne Hart

Spring Garden Wedding Inspiration | Gay Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

We are in love with the gorgeous and stunning colors in this greenhouse garden inspired wedding photo shoot from Jaclyn Schmitz Photography. With vibrant reds, oranges, pinks, and purples as a backdrop there is really no need for more decoration. Although some vintage Franciscan Ware dishes definitely add an elegant touch to the already ethereal surroundings. Spring and summer in Vermont features a plethora of lush flora and this is a perfect example of how to use Mother Nature to do your decorating for you!

The lovely brides features in this same-sex photo shoot are wearing different, but equally beautiful, gowns from Fiori Bridal Boutique. The intricate beadwork and lace details gives that mimic the floral surroundings. A lovely pairing of gowns that are similar but each a work of art in their own right. Their soft and romantic hair is also the perfect match for the sweet garden setting.

To see more photos from this inspiration feature, be sure to pick up a copy of our newest issue! The Summer/Fall 2016 Vermont Bride Magazine is available for purchase here!

Spring Garden Wedding Inspiration | Gay Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Spring Garden Wedding Inspiration | Gay Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Spring Garden Wedding Inspiration | Gay Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Spring Garden Wedding Inspiration | Gay Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

featured professionalsPHOTOGRAPHER:  Jaclyn Schmitz Photography | HAIR STYLIST: Finishing Touch | GOWN BOUTIQUE: Fiori Bridal Boutique | MAKEUP ARTIST: Jennifer Perellie Makeup | VENUE: Red Barn Gardens | Models: Danielle Larose & Sarah Elliott

 

Honoring Your Loved Ones Through Music Choices | Vermont Bride Magazine
photo by Mae Memories Photography

A 1927 photograph shows my grandparents on their wedding day, beaming with the newlywed glow of any young couple. My grandfather was a man of few spoken words, though he once wrote “I married a very wonderful girl in 1927…” and “We grew apples, potatoes, and peaches but our most important crop was our daughter and three sons.” I recall only one time, in the twelve years that our lives overlapped, that he spoke to me, the sixth of his ten grandchildren, directly. I was seven or eight and he in his mid-seventies, and slowing from progressing cancer. He sat in an easy chair during the day and once motioned to me to come to where he was. He took my hand and said “Where’s that chubby little girl? You’re almost grown up!” I remember the touch of his work-worn hand and the look in his eye. In hindsight I see in his face that I was, in that moment, along with my cousins and siblings, not only his most precious crop but the reason for every crop of his 75+ years, for every trip up the apple tower to survey the orchards, for every apple picked or pressed, eaten or sold, sauced or baked in a pie by my grandmother. We were the reason his parents immigrated from Sweden, and he, the youngest of their twelve children, was only one of two to live, marry, and have children in this new country. 

Every family has a precious and unique history. What better time to honor your loved ones than your wedding day? There are many ways to go about it, but consider what your music choices can say. At my wedding, I chose to include movements from Ingolf Dahl’s “Variations on a Swedish Folk Tune” to honor both of my grandfathers’ Swedish ancestry. We chose to have a contradance at the reception largely because we both loved contradancing, but it also honored both New England and Celtic roots.

If you want a ceremony and reception that thoroughly reflects a specific heritage, you may wish to choose a Klezmer band for a Jewish wedding, or a French Canadian Band to reflect French roots, or a similar choice. But many wedding couples may wish to have primarily classical music, but include some specific selections to reflect specific people or family backgrounds. I’ve often played Celtic selections for this purpose, intermixed with the classical. On one occasion I played a traditional Korean song, “Doraji,” as part of the prelude, to honor the bride’s Korean heritage. For weddings where one or both members of the couple are partially of Jewish descent, I enjoy movements from Michael Isaacson’s “A Jewish Wedding Suite,” arranged for flute, violin and cello. Movements from this suite include the folk songs “Dodi Li” (My Beloved), “Eishet Chayil” (A Woman of Valor), “Ma Navu” (The Messenger of Good Tidings), and more. Any of these folk tunes could also be played on other instruments, with the proper arrangement. There are infinite possibilities for couples wishing to reflect virtually any family background. (Bear in mind that depending on musicians and instruments chosen, as well as cost of purchasing music or potential complexity of arranging the music, there may - or may not - be additional fees involved, and certain specific selections may not work for certain instrument combinations). 

Perhaps a grandparent had or has a special hymn or song they always loved. Another thought may be to ask your grandparents or parents what was played at their wedding. Or if no one knows, perhaps you might wish to choose something that was popular at the time of their wedding. “It Had to Be You” was written in 1924, around the time my grandfather would been wooing my grandmother “away from the other fellow” (according to recent information from my uncle!). Hearing the song reminds me that my grandparents’ generation so long ago was not so different from my own generation, or from younger or future generations, reflecting the thoughts, the love, the care that any young couple today feels for one another. We’re all part of the story, taking what came before and weaving it into the future.

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She also teaches flute in Montpelier, Vermont and online to students worldwide.

Outdoor Music for your Ceremony | Vermont Bride Magazine
Photo by Daria Bishop Photographers

What could be more romantic and inspiring than to be married under the open sky, with lush green (or vibrant red, orange and yellow) surroundings, breathtaking mountain views in the distance, surrounded by wildflowers and feeling at one with the natural Vermont beauty around you? I love outdoor weddings. In my youth, avid hiker that I was, I envisioned being married on top of Camel’s Hump. But, as a musician, I’ve seen the fear and trepidation that the simple words “outdoor wedding” can sometimes cause for my fellow musicians. 

What do you, as a wedding couple, need to know about live music as you plan your outdoor ceremony? 

First, it’s fabulous to hear live music wafting over the grounds, blending with the wind and the birds and the scenery to create that amazing and unique sound and feeling you’re craving. It’s all generally very manageable, and most musicians are willing to play outdoors. The key is clear communication up front with your musicians.

Second, if your musician doesn’t bring up the question of their needs for protection of their instrument from a variety of weather-related possibilities, you should double check weather details with them to make sure you’re not in for a last minute surprise. 

I’ve heard many stories from both perspectives. The most common story goes roughly this way: “It rained. The musician played in the (garage; house; inside the Inn; you pick) and could not be heard from the ceremony site.” I’ve heard versions of this one from both the musician’s perspective and the bride’s perspective, and concluded that communication prior to and included in the contract about the conditions under which the musician will play outdoors are absolutely critical to avoid panic for musicians and terrible disappointment for the wedding couple. 

Some other stories and experiences along these lines that may be helpful in understanding the situation from both sides:

  • The father of the bride happens to see the violinist for the quartet a few days before the wedding. She casually mentions “You know we can’t play in sun?” Dad’s to-do list in the final days just got a lot longer with tracking down a tent.
  • The shade from the gazebo gradually moves out of the gazebo by the beginning of the 5:00 ceremony on a 95 degree day. The harp goes out of tune and musicians panic that the glue holding the instrument together will begin to melt away, potentially shortening the life of the beloved $30,000 instrument.
  • The oboist frantically warms the outside of her instrument with her hands to equalize the temperature between the 58 degree air outside of the instrument and the 98.6 degree air going in to prevent her $8,000 wooden instrument from cracking. 
  • I see beneath the well-rehearsed calm exterior to the pit of stomach reaction of the cellist, holding his $20,000 instrument, when told by the groom: “Yes, we lucked out with the weather, but we would have been outside even in a thunderstorm!”
  • The wind picks up, and the music on the stand blows out of view during the recessional, stopping the music. Experienced outdoor musicians usually clip down the music to the stand ahead of time, and hold the base with feet or wire loops in the ground and around the base, combined with feet. If your musician hasn’t discussed weather ahead of time, they may lack this type of outdoor wedding experience. Then again, strong wind may not be manageable for anyone. 

If your musician doesn’t mention weather, this doesn’t necessarily mean all will be well - different people have different assumptions about what is considered acceptable weather for making the choice to move indoors. Sometimes musicians may assume one thing while the wedding couple may not have thought about it, but would choose to be outdoors even if weather conditions are what a musician would simply assume would be unacceptable. So be sure you know what the musician is expecting and make sure it works with what you’re hoping for - and  be prepared for some “unpredictable as weather” moments in all aspects of your outdoor wedding planning. 

Here’s a list of weather conditions to discuss with your live musician to clarify their needs and your desires, and how to best ensure that everyone will be at their best on the day that counts. First, consider the listed possible weather conditions below and discuss with your partner under what conditions you would really want to stay outdoors. Next be completely up front with your musician about your interests and make sure they let you know under which conditions they might not be able to stay out in the open. And finally, discuss whether protection from the elements is something that you’re expected to provide or whether the musicians may provide some sort of protection, and specifically what conditions would ensure that they could provide that safely. Weather concerns for musicians may include: 1) rain - heavy, light, sprinkle or potential; 2) direct sun; 3) temperature - low or high; 4)wind conditions; 5) additional moisture (from wind, shade tree, leaking gazebo, even after the rain has stopped). 

Most of the weddings I play are outdoor weddings. And most experienced wedding musicians will bring up weather concerns or stipulations and be clear and up front about their needs. With proper communication and precautions taken, during the late spring, summer and early fall, the exquisite experience of live wedding music wafting through the great outdoors is normally quite manageable in Vermont!

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She also teaches flute in Montpelier, Vermont and online to students worldwide.

Gabrielle & Steve Real Wedding | Quebec Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

This sweet wedding, submitted to us by Annie Roy Imagine, is a fresh dose of romance and light. Given the current weather we are experiencing in the Northeast, we couldn't resist posting these warm pictures from Gabrielle and Steve's wedding in Quebec. Simple and airy, with a clean, white palette - it is the perfect summer inspiration to get us thinking about warmer weather, frolicking in fields dotted with flowers, and celebrating outside.

Gabrielle & Steve Real Wedding | Quebec Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Gabrielle & Steve Real Wedding | Quebec Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Gabrielle & Steve Real Wedding | Quebec Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Gabrielle & Steve Real Wedding | Quebec Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

featured professionalsPHOTOGRAPHER:  Annie Roy Imagine | VENUE: Domaine Franco | FLORAL DESIGNER: Halles en fleurs | EQUIPMENT RENTALS: Location Gervais | FLORAL DESIGNER: Renée Fleuriste | DRESS STORE: Sposa Bella bridal boutique | SHOES: Steve Madden

 

The first prominent use of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March, from the Ballet “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” was for the wedding recessional Princess Victoria, daughter of Queen Victoria, to Prince Frederick William of Prussia (pictures below).  In my experience, this remains the most popular wedding recessional today.

 Choosing Music for your Processional | Wedding Resources, Ideas, and Tips | Vermont Bride Magazine

 

For those of you who don’t summon the tune to mind at the mere mention of the title, or who just enjoy listening, here’s a video of the Berlin Philharmonic playing this popular piece:

 

 

Many people associate this piece with the organ – here’s a magnificent organ you might enjoy:

 

 

Now that you all know what music I’m talking about, you’re probably thinking either A) yes, definitely – it just wouldn’t feel like a wedding without walking back up the aisle at the end of the ceremony to that music! OR B) Ooh – no – I think that’s a little TOO traditional for my taste! Or perhaps C) hmm… maybe – what are the other choices? 

One thing to consider is that some religious denominations do not consider the Mendelssohn Wedding March to be appropriate at a sacred service, due to themes within the story line of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” 

 

The basic storyline of the play and the ballet is a comedy which involves love potions, magic spells, and misplaced passions, but in the end, couples reunite and wedding festivities ensue for three happy couples. 

So if you are having a religious ceremony, particularly a Catholic ceremony, you will want to discuss this option with your priest, minister or other officiant. Other than the potential religious conflict, primarily for some Catholic weddings, it all boils down to your personal preference, and your personal tendency toward tradition or toward more unique and personal choices.

 

Choosing Music for your Processional | Wedding Resources, Ideas, and Tips | Vermont Bride Magazine

 

If your response to the above was “What are our other choices?” then you’re in luck, since the options are many. A few alternatives I’ve found to be popular: “Rejouissance” from Handel’s Water Music; “Allegro” from Vivaldi’s Spring; or from a different angle: the Beatles “I Wanna Hold Your Hand;” or Coldplay’s “Viva la Vida.” And for those of you who would specifically prefer something that NOT so traditional, well, the sky’s the limit! Just keep in mind that in most cases you’ll want music that’s upbeat and celebratory as well as easy to walk to. Please check back – I’ll be posting an article on recessional alternatives soon, with more thoughts and additional possibilities I’ve experienced – both popular and VERY unique! 

Meanwhile, I thought that you might enjoy this little a cappella rendition of the Mendelssohn – particularly the non-traditionalists out there!

 

 Choosing Music for your Processional | Wedding Resources, Ideas, and Tips | Vermont Bride Magazine

Many thanks to Angel B. at  http://www.avictorian.com/ for sharing the photos of Princess Victoria’s wedding festivities above. 

Lisa Carlson is a flutist offering ensembles for weddings and other occasions in duos, trios, quartets in a variety of instrumental combinations, and staff wedding music writer for Vermont Bride Magazine. She also maintains a private flute  studio in Montpelier, Vermont, in addition to teaching flute at Upper Valley Music Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and online. 

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan's wedding at Stowe Mountain Resort was elegant with a touch of fun, and lots of meaningful details. Stowe is a favorite place for Vermont weddings and it is not hard to see why. With stunning mountain views and a modern twist on the classic ski lodge, it is a beautiful atmosphere to exchange your vows and throw an epic party. Caitlin and Dan's reception was no exception, with a signature Maple Old Fashioned drink, customized wooden signs made out of tree trunks, and we especially love the "Jenga" alternative to a guest book where guests wrote well wishes on wooden blocks.

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

Caitlin and Dan Real Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine | Stowe Mountain Resort

featured professionals | PHOTOGRAPHER: Paul Reynolds Photography | VENUE & CATERING: Stowe Mountain Resort |ICE CREAM BOOTH: Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream Booth | VIDEOGRAPHER: Boucher Visuals | EVENT & FLORAL DESIGN: A Schoolhouse Garden | DRESS DESIGNER: Amy Kuschel San Francisco  | TUXEDO AND MENS ATTIRE: Men's Wearhouse |FAVORS: Fat Toad Farm | STATIONERY: Jacqueline Mae Designs, Inc. |DJ: Top Hat DJ

 

“Oh yes that would be great!” or, more commonly, “NO WAY!” are typical answers I receive to the question of using Wagner’s Bridal Chorus for the bride’s processional. Very few people are undecided about having this piece, commonly known as “Here Comes the Bride” or occasionally “Wedding March” (not to be confused with the popular recessional “Wedding March” by Mendelssohn), at their wedding. I’d like to share some thoughts and video clips that might just switch some opinions one direction or another, so hold on, because although you’ve heard this tune before – probably many times, your thoughts on this piece of music might just do a few backflips!

First, let’s start with this gorgeous and unique rendition of this popular processional:

 

So if you were on the “No Way!” end of things, I suspect there’s a chance that if you listened to the above you may be second guessing yourself. Now, don’t get too set on that choice too quickly though, since I haven’t started the con argument yet, but I just thought I’d allow a moment to enjoy the beauty of this music. On that note, here’s the original, as Wagner composed it, for your enjoyment:

 

 

So – Wagner’s Bridal Chorus can be really lovely, and the words are quite lovely as well – here’s the English translation of the first verse, as provided by Wikipedia:

Faithfully guided, draw near

to where the blessing of love shall preserve you!

Triumphant courage, the reward of love,

joins you in faith as the happiest of couples!

Champion of virtue, proceed!

Jewel of youth, proceed!

Flee now the splendour of the wedding feast,

may the delights of the heart be yours!

This sweet-smelling room, decked for love,

now takes you in, away from the splendour.

Faithfully guided, draw now near

to where the blessing of love shall preserve you!

Triumphant courage, love so pure,

joins you in faith as the happiest of couples!

Wagner’s Bridal Chorus was first used as a wedding processional at the wedding of Princess Victoria, eldest daughter of Queen Victoria, to Prince William Frederick of Prussia in 1858 (pictured below). It was the standard for the bride’s processional through most of the 20th century, and remains popular today. 

 Your Processional: Wagner’s Bridal Chorus – Yes or No? | Vermont Bride Magazine

So some of you may be thinking “Wow! Yes - let’s use Wagner’s Bridal Chorus for our wedding!” Others are surely NOT convinced – and I will now assert that there is in fact potentially good reason to avoid this piece.  So now for the cons.

First, there are some religious traditions which do not allow the Bridal Chorus, commonly Catholic and Lutheran weddings as well as some other Christian traditions, due to thematic material in the opera from which it came. Second, Wagner was terribly anti-Semitic, and in fact Hitler was a great fan of Wagner’s music. If you will have Jewish guests at your wedding, you may wish to think twice about using any music by Wagner, particularly this piece, which does have connotations for many Jewish guests. Rumors circulated at one point that this piece was selected to accompany the march of concentration camp residents to the gas chamber during World War II. It appears that this has not been validated, but it’s difficult to separate this piece from that image once the thought has been circulated.  

Also, although Wagner’s opera Lohengrin, and his music, are beautiful, and the words to the Bridal Chorus seem very appropriately beautiful for a wedding, the opera itself is a tragedy, ending with the death of the bride and groom before their marriage is consummated. 

When I was in elementary school, my brothers always sang “Here comes the bride, big fat and wide, here comes the groom as skinny as a broom.” I suspect that’s often reason in itself to NOT choose this piece for your wedding. And finally, some couples simply wish to go off the beaten path for their wedding music choices. And THAT may be the ultimate question – are you a traditionalist? Or do you like to do things a little differently? 

My take on that is: It’s your wedding, you know who your guests are, and it’s your choice, perhaps with input from your officiant. I hope this article has you thinking from a new angle! My hope is that that will help YOU to refine your choices of what will make your wedding feel like your own!

Many thanks to Angel B. at  http://www.avictorian.com/ for sharing the photo of Princess Victoria’s wedding above. 

Lisa Carlson is a flutist offering ensembles for weddings and other occasions in duos, trios, quartets in a variety of instrumental combinations, and staff wedding music writer for Vermont Bride Magazine. She also maintains a private flute  studio in Montpelier, Vermont, in addition to teaching flute at Upper Valley Music Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and online.

Vermont Bride Lookbook No. 6 | Vermont Wedding Inspiration | Digital Edition

When we hatched the idea to publish a bi-annual, digital lookbook, we realized that it was not an entirely new idea. Of course the term "lookbook" has been used in the fashion industry for a while, and there have been other wedding magazines that have published digital versions of their magazine. But we wanted to do it better. And we wanted it to have more. More inspiration, more real weddings, and more resources for our readers. The Vermont Bride Lookbook goes beyond being a traditional "lookbook", which typically features images only and very little text. It is truly a digital version of our print magazine, with all of the same great content and information.

Vermont Bride Lookbook No. 6 | Vermont Wedding Inspiration | Digital Edition

Vermont Bride Lookbook No. 6 | Vermont Wedding Inspiration | Digital Edition

The true beauty of it is that it is digital and free. It is accessible to anyone with the internet and viewable on all devices, from desktop computer to smart phones. You don't have to live in Vermont or New England to get a copy. You don't have to order one or drive to the store to buy it. And it is available to view months, even years, after it originally is published. You can pin any of the images inside of it, or email a link to your florist or venue. Share it on Facebook or Twitter too! And if you see a wedding professional inside that you want to find out more information about - just a click of your mouse and you can contact them or view more information about them.

Vermont Bride Lookbook No. 6 | Vermont Wedding Inspiration | Digital Edition

So, without further adieu, we are excited to release Issue No. 6 of the Vermont Bride Lookbook today! You can view it on our Lookbook Page, as well as check out all of the past issues of the Lookbook. Issue No. 6 has beautiful, fresh inspiration - romantic, modern, rustic, and vintage - we cover it all. The pages are full of bright colors, perfect for a late-winter pick-me-up. And the cornerstone of our publication - the resources and information to help you find the best Vermont wedding vendors. From photographers to florists, from caterers to registries. Plan your honeymoon, find a musician, and locate the perfect setting for saying "I do".

Vermont Bride Lookbook No. 6 | Vermont Wedding Inspiration | Digital Edition

And of course the Lookbook would not be complete without our real wedding features. We hand picked nine celebrations from all over the state, featuring different styles and themes, so you can see how it all comes together in the end. Get your creative juices flowing and start planning something amazine. We hope you enjoy it as much as we enjoyed putting it together!

Valentine's Day Picnic | Red and Pink Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Being in the wedding magazine business pretty much sets you up to fall in love with love, so every day is like Valentine's Day. But when February 14th rolls around each year we still get just as excited as you! All the electricity in the air from new relationships to new engagements, it makes our hearts go pitter-patter. So when we saw this Valentine's Day Picnic inspiration, by Staged Fine by Design, we immediately wanted to settle into the soft pillows, pop a chocolate or two, and snuggle with our sweethearts.

It might be too cold still in Vermont for a woodland picnic on V-day, but re-create this scene in front of a nice big fireplace and we're there!

 Valentine's Day Picnic | Red and Pink Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

Valentine's Day Picnic | Red and Pink Wedding Inspiration | Vermont Bride Magazine

featured vendorsDESIGN: Staged Fine by Design | PHOTOGRAPHY: Emily Louise Photography & Ilona Gorokhoskiy | FLORALS: Seattle Flower Truck | DESSERT: Cupcakes by Ariana