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Casablanca 2233 | Carnation | Blush Gowns | Vermont Bride Magazine | Fiori Bridal Boutique
Casablanca № 2233 ~ Carnation | Carnation is a strapless, form fitting, fit-n-flare gown that boasts a sumptuous combination of beaded and embroidered tulle over iridescent organza with sleek satin lining. The sweetheart neckline and sweeping train add a dramatic twist to this gown.

Blush is the rising star of wedding gown fashion with many of the top designers offering various shades of the delicate and feminine color as an alternative to the traditional white and ivory. Luxurious layers of tulle, lace, and satin are dreamy, delicate, and perfect for the bride looking for a gown that will make her feel like a princess.

All of the featured gowns are available at Fiori Bridal Boutique, in Essex Junction, Vermont.

Casablanca 2230 Lilac | Blush Gown Inspiration | Fiori Bridal Boutique | Vermont Bride MagazineCasablanca № 2230 ~ Lilac | Lilac is a flattering A-line gown with an illusion bateau neckline that follows the delicate curve of the collar bone, and is beaded front and back. Lace appliqués run the length of this tulle gown over satin lining and down onto the scallop lace train, while dainty buttons are sprinkled down the illusion back.

Stella York 6025 | Blush Gown Inspiration | Fiori Bridal Boutique | Vermont Bride Magazine
Stella York № 6025 | This flowing Stella York sheath bridal gown was imagined and crafted to provide an exceptional fit without sacrificing comfort . Constructed from breezy tulle and corded lace, it is completed with a Diamante-beaded belt that slims the waist – showing off your curves. The back of this bridal gown zips up under fabric-covered buttons for ease of use. Inspired by whimsy and romance, this gown would complete any beachside wedding.

Essence of Australia D2088 | Blush Gown Inspiration | Fiori Bridal Boutique | Vermont Bride Magazine
Essence of Australia № D2088 | This eye-catching Regency organza wedding dress from the Essense of Australia bridal gown collection boasts figure-flattering ruched pleating on its fitted bodice, a sweetheart neckline, a slimming dropped waist, and layers of flowing organza on its skirt and chapel train.

Justin Alexander 8825 | Blush Gown Inspiration | Fiori Bridal Boutique | Vermont Bride Magazine
Justin Alexander № 8825 | An elegant silk dupioni ball gown with piped neckline and waistline, full gathered skirt and pockets create simplicity at its best. The color is pearl pink.

 

Prince William and Catherine Middleton Wedding Music Inspiration | Royal Wedding Fifth Anniversary | Vermont Bride Magazine
Photo by Hugo Burnand

This article originally appeared in Vermont Bride Magazine in 2011, revisited in honor of the royal couple’s fifth anniversary which occured this past April 29th.

When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, then Prince William and Miss Catherine Middleton, were selecting music for their wedding, they wove threads of many colors and textures into the fabric of their day. The majority of people watching from around the world were probably aware of the majesty of the sound, and the familiarity of some of the hymns, but I would venture to guess that relatively few were aware of the personal significance of Prince William and Miss Middleton’s choices, nor how those choices wove their ceremony, and their future life together, into the fabric of family, community, country and world. Royal weddings can set precedents for the rest of us long after the event itself – as can be seen in the case of the use of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March for the 1858 wedding of Princess Victoria and Prince Frederick. I invite you to a closer look at William and Kate’s wedding music, not so much with the idea of duplicating the specific choices, but in considering their planning approach as you plan a wedding that will reflect your own life, your past, your present, and your future, as individuals, as a couple, as a family and part of a community.

The bride’s processional, “I Was Glad” by Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, was selected partly for its ability to fill the large hall with theatrical impact while accenting rather than detracting from the bride herself, and partly because it was a favorite of the couple and was written by Prince William’s favorite composer, but it also represents family history in that it was composed for William’s great-great-great grandfather Edward VII’s coronation in 1902. The recessional, “Crown Imperial” by William Walton, was originally performed for the coronation of King George VI in 1937, and was also played for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

Prince William and Catherine Middleton Wedding Music Inspiration | Royal Wedding Fifth Anniversary | Vermont Bride Magazine

Three of the couple’s favorite hymns were sung during the ceremony. Notably, “Guide Me, O Thou Great Redeemer” was the final hymn at William’s mother, Diana’s, funeral. The second hymn, “Love Divine All Love Excelling” is considered one of Britain’s top ten favorite hymns and has also been sung at other of their family ceremonies, and the third, “Jerusalem,” references the poet William Blake’s perspective on social inequalities of the industrial era, with notable similarities to the social priorities and interests of the royal couple, as well as the final statement regarding better days “on England’s green and pleasant land.”

Three selections for the prelude (Farewell to Stromness by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Touch Her Soft Lips and Part by William Walton, and Romance for String Orchestra by Gerald Finzi) were chosen specifically because of their use at the Service of Prayer and Dedication for the Prince of Wales (William’s father) and the Duchess of Cornwall, following their wedding service in 2005. 

One of the clearest threads in Kate and William’s choices was the emphasis on 20th century British composers. The only exceptions were two organ compositions at the beginning and end – Fantasia in G by Johann Sebastian Bach – and Toccata from Organ Symphonie V by French composer Charles-Marie Widor. I can only speculate on the significance of opening and closing with representation of the greater European world, representing the gifts of one of the first and greatest organ compositions and another by a composer who lived at the time the Westminster Abbey organ was rebuilt.

Miss Middleton had two more priorities in her music selection. She chose a selection representing a beautiful theme of hundreds of years of England’s history – Fantasia on Greensleeves by Vaugh Williams (original theme likely by Henry VIII from the 16th century) – and also placed a high priority on recently composed music. Three pieces on the program filled this second need: the Fanfare following the signing of the registers, composed for this occasion by Wing commander Duncan Stubbs; the Anthem: “This is the Day Which the Lord Hath Made” by John Rutter, commissioned by Westminster Abbey as a gift for Prince William and Miss Middleton, and “Ubi Caritas,” a 2010 selection from 36 year old composer Paul Mealor, resident of the Isle of Anglesey in Wales, where the Duke and Duchess also reside.

Though few of us can afford to commission a new piece for our wedding, to be played on one of the world’s greatest organs, as well as a full professional orchestra and choir, and few of us have coronations in our family history, I believe we all have many threads in common with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. 

Several threads of joy, a thread of grief, some of community, some of country, some of the greater world, many threads of love, many threads of faith, a thread of spring, a thread of sorrow, a thread of awareness of the need to work for a bright future, many historical threads, and some brand new threads. This is the fabric of a couple. This is the fabric of a family and a community. What musical selections represent what you love? your family? your community? your outlook on the world? your tastes and preferences? your history and your hopes for the future? The musical choices you weave into your wedding day can reflect and interconnect, and hold a place in your world from which you and your loved ones may grow, safely and joyfully, together.

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She maintains a private flute studio for in Montpelier, Vermont and also teaches online to students worldwide.

 

Honoring Your Loved Ones Through Music Choices | Vermont Bride Magazine
photo by Mae Memories Photography

A 1927 photograph shows my grandparents on their wedding day, beaming with the newlywed glow of any young couple. My grandfather was a man of few spoken words, though he once wrote “I married a very wonderful girl in 1927…” and “We grew apples, potatoes, and peaches but our most important crop was our daughter and three sons.” I recall only one time, in the twelve years that our lives overlapped, that he spoke to me, the sixth of his ten grandchildren, directly. I was seven or eight and he in his mid-seventies, and slowing from progressing cancer. He sat in an easy chair during the day and once motioned to me to come to where he was. He took my hand and said “Where’s that chubby little girl? You’re almost grown up!” I remember the touch of his work-worn hand and the look in his eye. In hindsight I see in his face that I was, in that moment, along with my cousins and siblings, not only his most precious crop but the reason for every crop of his 75+ years, for every trip up the apple tower to survey the orchards, for every apple picked or pressed, eaten or sold, sauced or baked in a pie by my grandmother. We were the reason his parents immigrated from Sweden, and he, the youngest of their twelve children, was only one of two to live, marry, and have children in this new country. 

Every family has a precious and unique history. What better time to honor your loved ones than your wedding day? There are many ways to go about it, but consider what your music choices can say. At my wedding, I chose to include movements from Ingolf Dahl’s “Variations on a Swedish Folk Tune” to honor both of my grandfathers’ Swedish ancestry. We chose to have a contradance at the reception largely because we both loved contradancing, but it also honored both New England and Celtic roots.

If you want a ceremony and reception that thoroughly reflects a specific heritage, you may wish to choose a Klezmer band for a Jewish wedding, or a French Canadian Band to reflect French roots, or a similar choice. But many wedding couples may wish to have primarily classical music, but include some specific selections to reflect specific people or family backgrounds. I’ve often played Celtic selections for this purpose, intermixed with the classical. On one occasion I played a traditional Korean song, “Doraji,” as part of the prelude, to honor the bride’s Korean heritage. For weddings where one or both members of the couple are partially of Jewish descent, I enjoy movements from Michael Isaacson’s “A Jewish Wedding Suite,” arranged for flute, violin and cello. Movements from this suite include the folk songs “Dodi Li” (My Beloved), “Eishet Chayil” (A Woman of Valor), “Ma Navu” (The Messenger of Good Tidings), and more. Any of these folk tunes could also be played on other instruments, with the proper arrangement. There are infinite possibilities for couples wishing to reflect virtually any family background. (Bear in mind that depending on musicians and instruments chosen, as well as cost of purchasing music or potential complexity of arranging the music, there may - or may not - be additional fees involved, and certain specific selections may not work for certain instrument combinations). 

Perhaps a grandparent had or has a special hymn or song they always loved. Another thought may be to ask your grandparents or parents what was played at their wedding. Or if no one knows, perhaps you might wish to choose something that was popular at the time of their wedding. “It Had to Be You” was written in 1924, around the time my grandfather would been wooing my grandmother “away from the other fellow” (according to recent information from my uncle!). Hearing the song reminds me that my grandparents’ generation so long ago was not so different from my own generation, or from younger or future generations, reflecting the thoughts, the love, the care that any young couple today feels for one another. We’re all part of the story, taking what came before and weaving it into the future.

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She also teaches flute in Montpelier, Vermont and online to students worldwide.

 

Outdoor Music for your Ceremony | Vermont Bride Magazine
Photo by Daria Bishop Photographers

What could be more romantic and inspiring than to be married under the open sky, with lush green (or vibrant red, orange and yellow) surroundings, breathtaking mountain views in the distance, surrounded by wildflowers and feeling at one with the natural Vermont beauty around you? I love outdoor weddings. In my youth, avid hiker that I was, I envisioned being married on top of Camel’s Hump. But, as a musician, I’ve seen the fear and trepidation that the simple words “outdoor wedding” can sometimes cause for my fellow musicians. 

What do you, as a wedding couple, need to know about live music as you plan your outdoor ceremony? 

First, it’s fabulous to hear live music wafting over the grounds, blending with the wind and the birds and the scenery to create that amazing and unique sound and feeling you’re craving. It’s all generally very manageable, and most musicians are willing to play outdoors. The key is clear communication up front with your musicians.

Second, if your musician doesn’t bring up the question of their needs for protection of their instrument from a variety of weather-related possibilities, you should double check weather details with them to make sure you’re not in for a last minute surprise. 

I’ve heard many stories from both perspectives. The most common story goes roughly this way: “It rained. The musician played in the (garage; house; inside the Inn; you pick) and could not be heard from the ceremony site.” I’ve heard versions of this one from both the musician’s perspective and the bride’s perspective, and concluded that communication prior to and included in the contract about the conditions under which the musician will play outdoors are absolutely critical to avoid panic for musicians and terrible disappointment for the wedding couple. 

Some other stories and experiences along these lines that may be helpful in understanding the situation from both sides:

  • The father of the bride happens to see the violinist for the quartet a few days before the wedding. She casually mentions “You know we can’t play in sun?” Dad’s to-do list in the final days just got a lot longer with tracking down a tent.
  • The shade from the gazebo gradually moves out of the gazebo by the beginning of the 5:00 ceremony on a 95 degree day. The harp goes out of tune and musicians panic that the glue holding the instrument together will begin to melt away, potentially shortening the life of the beloved $30,000 instrument.
  • The oboist frantically warms the outside of her instrument with her hands to equalize the temperature between the 58 degree air outside of the instrument and the 98.6 degree air going in to prevent her $8,000 wooden instrument from cracking. 
  • I see beneath the well-rehearsed calm exterior to the pit of stomach reaction of the cellist, holding his $20,000 instrument, when told by the groom: “Yes, we lucked out with the weather, but we would have been outside even in a thunderstorm!”
  • The wind picks up, and the music on the stand blows out of view during the recessional, stopping the music. Experienced outdoor musicians usually clip down the music to the stand ahead of time, and hold the base with feet or wire loops in the ground and around the base, combined with feet. If your musician hasn’t discussed weather ahead of time, they may lack this type of outdoor wedding experience. Then again, strong wind may not be manageable for anyone. 

If your musician doesn’t mention weather, this doesn’t necessarily mean all will be well - different people have different assumptions about what is considered acceptable weather for making the choice to move indoors. Sometimes musicians may assume one thing while the wedding couple may not have thought about it, but would choose to be outdoors even if weather conditions are what a musician would simply assume would be unacceptable. So be sure you know what the musician is expecting and make sure it works with what you’re hoping for - and  be prepared for some “unpredictable as weather” moments in all aspects of your outdoor wedding planning. 

Here’s a list of weather conditions to discuss with your live musician to clarify their needs and your desires, and how to best ensure that everyone will be at their best on the day that counts. First, consider the listed possible weather conditions below and discuss with your partner under what conditions you would really want to stay outdoors. Next be completely up front with your musician about your interests and make sure they let you know under which conditions they might not be able to stay out in the open. And finally, discuss whether protection from the elements is something that you’re expected to provide or whether the musicians may provide some sort of protection, and specifically what conditions would ensure that they could provide that safely. Weather concerns for musicians may include: 1) rain - heavy, light, sprinkle or potential; 2) direct sun; 3) temperature - low or high; 4)wind conditions; 5) additional moisture (from wind, shade tree, leaking gazebo, even after the rain has stopped). 

Most of the weddings I play are outdoor weddings. And most experienced wedding musicians will bring up weather concerns or stipulations and be clear and up front about their needs. With proper communication and precautions taken, during the late spring, summer and early fall, the exquisite experience of live wedding music wafting through the great outdoors is normally quite manageable in Vermont!

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She also teaches flute in Montpelier, Vermont and online to students worldwide.

 

Choosing Ceremony Music | Vermont Bride Magazine
photo by Steve Holmes Photography

You can perfectly envision the moment you’ll begin the walk down the aisle and into your new life.  The perfect location, gorgeous dress, the flowers. Now even the flower girls have completed their walk down the aisle, and the music stops. Your processional has begun.

It’s the moment you’ve dreamed of for so long, finally here. What music will usher you down the aisle to the love of your life? What will he be feeling when he hears the music? 

There are so many choices for today’s couples. While many make traditional music choices for their ceremonies, for twenty-first century weddings, just about anything goes. If you’re feeling a little overwhelmed by all the choices, here are a few thoughts to help you find the direction that’s best for you, to make the ambiance of your most special moment truly memorable, and truly personal.

First, are you a person who likes tradition, or someone who likes to forge new ground? Does a wedding without Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March” at the end feel like a birthday without singing “Happy Birthday”, breakfast without orange juice, or Hanukkah without latkes? I know some who hate the song “Happy Birthday”– and can’t stand the thought of the popular wedding choices at their wedding. But for some they are as dear as “Silent Night” at Christmas time, as comforting as a “welcome home” hug, and as full of anticipation and excitement as a child’s birthday wish coming true. 

If you’re a tradition lover, your choices will be relatively easy. The vast majority of couples choose the Mendelssohn “Wedding March” for the recessional (Click the following link for a basic description of wedding music terms like “recessional”). In my experience, the most popular choice for the bride’s processional is the Pachelbel “Canon in D.” The second most popular choice is the traditional Wagner “Bridal Chorus” (“Here Comes the Bride”). I have played some weddings where both are played: the Pachelbel  Canon for the wedding party and the Bridal Chorus for the bride. 

Just about everyone wants music that’s joyful and lively for the recessional, so that’s an easy place to start.  Here are a few alternatives to Mendelssohn you may wish to consider: 

  • “La Rejouissance” from “The Fireworks Music” by Handel
  • “Trumpet Tune” by Purcell 
  • “Trumpet Voluntary” by Clarke (also called the “Prince of Denmark’s March”)
  • “Gigue” from Suite #3 in D Major by J.S. Bach
  • “Allegro” from “Spring” from “The Four Seasons” by Vivaldi
  • “Hornpipe” from “The Water Music” by Handel

The list above works well for almost any instrument combination, and all are popular choices. Of course, some couples might choose a popular tune, a show tune, a hymn, or maybe a Celtic or Jazz piece – you name it! Here are a few truly alternative examples I’ve experienced:

  • “Do You Hear the People Sing” from Les Miserables by Claude-Michel Schonberg
  • “Carolan’s Concerto” by Turlough O’Carolan
  • Medley of: “One Hand, One Heart” from “West Side Story” by Leonard Bernstein,  “And This is My Beloved” by Robert Wright and  George Forrest,” “Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me” by George Gershwin, and “All I Ask of You” by Andrew Lloyd Weber.
  • “Hallelujah Chorus” from “The Messiah” by Handel
  • “Everyone” by VanMorrison
  • A medley of traditional Scottish tunes played by the bride’s grandfather on bagpipes
  • “Get Happy” by Judy Garland
  • “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” by John Lennon and Paul McCartney
  • “Viva la Vida” by Coldplay

 

Choosing Ceremony Music | Vermont Bride Magazine

I hope you get the idea about how numerous and varied the options are! You’ll definitely want to check with your musicians to confirm that your choices are workable for their particular instrument combination. Your musicians may have additional ideas as well. There are too many options to list here, and many work well for some instrument combinations, but not for others, so do be sure to talk about your thoughts early in the process with your musician(s).

The bride’s processional is probably your most important musical choice. The first question: would you like your processional to be of the fanfare variety (like the Wagner “Bridal Chorus”) or the flowing variety (more like the Pachelbel Canon)? Do you fantasize a regal and stately entrance following a trumpet style musical introduction? Or do you prefer the simple but elegant glide?

Here are some processional possibilities that work well for virtually all instrument combinations. All are workable for either the bride or the wedding party:

Regal, fanfare style processional suggestions:

  • “Trumpet Voluntary” by Clarke
  • “Trumpet Tune” by Purcell 

More flowing processional possibilities:

  • “Air” from “Water Music” by Handel
  • “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” by J.S. Bach
  • “Sheep May Safely Graze” by J.S. Bach
  • Theme from “Ode to Joy” by Beethoven

Below are a few possibilities that I’ve experienced that are more uncommon:

  • “Carol of the Bells” by Ukrainian composer Mykola Leontovych, for a December wedding
  • “Leezie Lindsay” traditional Scottish folk song
  • “Meditation” from “Thais” by Jules Massenet
  • “If We Hold On Together” from “Land Before Time” 
  • “All I Ask of You” by Andrew Lloyd Weber
  • “Sinfonia” from “Cantata 156” by J.S. Bach

Choices for music in the middle of the ceremony vary much more than processional and recessional choices. You may wish to ask a religious leader or your musicians for specific additional recommendations. Many of the pieces listed as processionals could also work well here. Below are a few additional pieces I’ve found to be popular for such a moment:

  • “Simple Gifts” 
  • “Amazing Grace”
  • “On Eagle’s Wings” by Michael Joncas
  • “The Rose” by Amanda McBroom
  • Virtually any hymn that fits the mood 

And a few others that I’ve experienced:

  • “Fannie Power”  traditional Celtic tune
  • “Sarabande” from Partita for Solo Flute by J.S. Bach
  • “Sicilienne” from Sonata in E flat for Flute and Piano by J.S. Bach

It’s my view that the most important elements of planning music for a wedding are: 

  1. Consider whether there’s a special piece of music – a tune, a song, a classical piece – that resonates with you and/or your partner, or that has special meaning for a family member or friend. If so, work with your musicians and your officiant to include that music in some way in your ceremony.  A special tune on your wedding day may put a hum on your lips and in your heart, and in the hearts of friends and family, for many years to come!
  2. Ask advice from the musicians you’ll be working with. They may be able to easily guide you toward music you’ll love that works well for their particular combination of instruments. They will also be able to discuss with you whether a particular piece of music would not be ideal in the instrument combination you’ve chosen.
  3. Be aware that the music establishes the background feelings that will color your ceremony and your memories. Select music that resonates for you in the way you’ll want to remember forever.

Lisa Carlson is a freelance flutist, performing for weddings and other occasions throughout Vermont and beyond, with musical offerings ranging from a quartet of flute with violin, viola and cello, to solo flute, to duos and trios of flute with harp, violin, piano, cello, oboe, and more. She also teaches flute in Montpelier, Vermont and online to students worldwide.