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Hold onto your hats, it’s Pachelbel’s Canon in D, in more ways than you could have imagined! It’s currently known as the most popular current choice for a wedding processional, and ever since George Winston recorded it on piano, also a holiday favorite (you’ll find his version at the bottom). I got inspired to see how many different variations of high quality recordings are available on YouTube. You would definitely NOT want some of these at your wedding, but it might be fun to have a listen.

First, I thought I’d start with a video that’s the most exemplary of what Pachelbel would have intended: 

So how did Pachelbel’s Canon become so popular at weddings? After muddling around in almost complete obscurity for over 250 years, how did it suddenly become the perfect wedding tune for everyone in the 1970s and 80s and into the 21st century? Well, after being rediscovered in the early twentieth century, and recorded by a few well-known performers, from Arthur Fiedler in 1940 to George Winston in 1982, and many others in between, it struck a chord with many people. 

It has that stately elegance, and sense of expectant waiting that defines the feeling that most people seek in announcing the bride’s entrance and the upcoming transformation from two individuals to a married couple. On a practical level, it has much flexibility – it can be played on any instrument combination and still have the effect of an elegant announcement – particularly since our culture recognizes it in this context. It also has eight beat phrases that come to a potential natural stopping point after each – so regardless of how long it takes the bride to reach the altar, the music can end gracefully.

Then again, cellists have been known to fall asleep during their highly repetitive sequence – and I’m sure you’d prefer NOT to have this version at your wedding – unless it’s at your reception, with the part where the cellist is dreaming:

 

The Hidden Gold in Vermont | Why Vermont Wedding Vendors Are The Best | Vermont Bride Magazine
photo by Ashley Largesse Photography

Everyone knows about the blazing reds, brilliant oranges, and yellows from their late September luminosity to their late October warmth, in our Vermont autumn. Everyone knows about the lush green of the Vermont mountains in summer, and the breathtaking billows of white in the Vermont winter. These are all great reasons to have a Vermont wedding, but I would like to suggest that the best reason of all to have a Vermont wedding is the hidden gold of the people of Vermont wedding industry. Not only do these Vermonters show a high level of excellence in their own area of expertise, but a cooperative spirit which I believe is unrivaled, and truly sets the stage for the very best day possible.

I’ve had numerous conversations over the years with wedding venders who have moved from out of state. They tend to progress along the same lines. The wedding industry in other states (I won’t be specific, but we’ve covered quite a few states in these conversations!) tends to operate more on a competitive level, with each person exclusively doing their own aspect of the job, with little or no consideration of how each person fits within the big picture. The focus is not so much on the totality of the day from the couples’ or families’ experience, but just on doing their thing and moving on to the next gig. On moving to Vermont, a whole new world opened up for these wedding venders – in getting to know the other folks around them who were working on the same weddings, they realized that everything is so much more enjoyable and works so much more smoothly when they know the other folks who are parts of the same overall picture of the day. 

The Hidden Gold in Vermont | Why Vermont Wedding Vendors Are The Best | Vermont Bride Magazine

 

Save the date for the Essence of Australia Designer Show, at Fiori Bridal Boutique from November 20-21. You will get a chance to be one of the first to view and try on the newest gowns in the collection! Plus the knowledgable and experienced staff at Fiori Bridal will help you find a gown that is perfect for you.

Fiori Bridal Boutique is located at 18 Main Street in Essex Junction. Check out Fiori Bridal Boutique on our site, or give them a call at 802-872-9663 for more information.

Essence of Australia Designer Show at Fiori Bridal Boutique | November 20-21, 2015

 

Using Wedding Hashtags | Vermont Bride Magazine

Wedding hashtags have become ever more popular in the past few years, and are a great way to follow your guests’ posts on social media. 

For those of you not “in the know,” a hashtag is essentially a label for content, specifically twitter and instagram, as well pinterest, facebook, and . It is an easy way for others to search on a specific topic, and is a phrase or a few words with no spaces, followed by the # symbol. The current most popular hashtag on instagram at the time of writing this post, is #fashion, being used over 213,000,000 times and counting.  Other popular hashtags include #friends, and #smile.

Using Wedding Hashtags | Vermont Bride Magazine

If you choose to create a wedding hashtag for your special day, there are a few things to keep in mind:

 

Choosing Your Prelude Music | Vermont Bride Magazine
Photo by North Photography

The wedding prelude refers to music played as guests arrive at the ceremony site, to welcome them, and to set the mood. The prelude typically begins 20-30 minutes prior to the ceremony, and continues until the cue is received by the musicians to begin the first processional for the entrance of the wedding party. 

I once had a somewhat awkward experience due to a miscommunication regarding use of the word “prelude.” Five minutes prior to the planned ceremony start time, as previously discussed with the wedding couple, we began a special piece chosen by the couple to be a part of the prelude, in order to ensure that there would be time to play it all the way through. It was understood that it wouldn’t be immediately prior to the ceremony, but that it would be close to the planned ceremony time. We had been told that our only cue would be for the processional for the wedding party. But the minister arrived quite late. Shortly after his arrival, clearly nervous from being late, he came up to us abruptly and told us clearly that it was time. When we started the processional, he waved and shook his head, stopping the music and quietly saying “no it’s not time for the processional; it’s time for the prelude!” as he frantically pointed to the program he placed in front of us. We quickly gathered that he had interpreted the word “prelude” as meaning the single piece listed under prelude in the program, and concluded that the smoothest plan was simply to go with the flow. We immediately began that special prelude selection – which everyone other than the minister had already recently heard - again.

I often encounter confusion relative to prelude choices, so here are some common questions and confusions I’ve experienced, with answers!